Archives

  • Sunday, April 8, 2012

    Ziarat: The Home

    of Second Largest Juniper Tree Forest in the World

  • Ziarat literally means a place for pilgrimage. Ziarat as a small dwelling, existed much before the advent of the British Rule in the Sub-continent. Its local name then was Gwuskhi or Kowashki and was changed to its present name of Ziarat in 1886. It derived its name from the neighbouring shrine of famous Muslim saint Mian Abdul Hakim, popularly known as Mulla Tahir and Kharwari Baba. The shrine is situated in the valley, below south of Ziarat Town.

  • Monday, April 16, 2012

    Home of world’s

    most delicious Mangoes: Second largest fruit crop of the country

  • Mango (Mangifera indica L Family Anacardiaceae) is the second largest fruit crop of Pakistan. At present it is grown on an area of 170.1000 thousand hectares with production 1727.9000 thousand tones (Agricultural Statistics of Pakistan 2008-09). The area under mango crop has increased but the rise in production is comparatively slow. The main mango growing districts in the Punjab province are Multan, Bahawalpur, Muzzaffargarh and Rahim yar Khan.

  • Thursday, April 19, 2012

    The delectable Pakistani

    Truck Art: Magic of skill and craftsmanship

  • Just like the Billboard painting performed in Pakistan, there is another indigenous form of art performed and it is the Truck Painting. With its all colorful floral patterns, depiction of human heroes with creative aspect ratios, calligraphy of poetic verses and driver’s words of wisdom, this form of art is truly a part of Pakistani transport tradition.

  • Thursday, April 26, 2012

    Katas Raj Temple

    sinking back in oblivion as the pond is deprived of its only water source

  • Like many other historic tourist resorts in the country, the ancient Katas Raj Temple in Choa Saidan Shah is now under serious threat of the raging indutrialization in the region.

  • Saturday, April 28, 2012

    Home of world's

    sweetest Mulberries.

  • Mulberries are large, deciduous trees inhabitant to humid, temperate, and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Technically, the mulberry fruit is an aggregation of small fruits arranged longitudinally around the central axis as in blackberry or loganberries.